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September 20, 2012

Libyan fighters ‘return favour’ in Syria battles

 

20 September 2012 – 16H12
Fighters with the Free Syrian Army regroup at their base in Azaz, some 47km north of Aleppo, on September 13. Firas, a youth who helped topple Libyan dictator Moamer Kadhafi last year, says Syrians aided in that struggle and he has now come to Syria to return the favour.

Fighters with the Free Syrian Army regroup at their base in Azaz, some 47km north of Aleppo, on September 13. Firas, a youth who helped topple Libyan dictator Moamer Kadhafi last year, says Syrians aided in that struggle and he has now come to Syria to return the favour.
Syrian President Bashar al-Assad (right) joins hands with then-Libyan leader Moamer Kadhafi, who went on to be ousted and killed in 2011, at the opening session of the Arab Summit in Damascus on March 29, 2008. Some Libyan fighters who helped oust Kadhafi's regime are now in Syria to join the revolution against Assad.

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad (right) joins hands with then-Libyan leader Moamer Kadhafi, who went on to be ousted and killed in 2011, at the opening session of the Arab Summit in Damascus on March 29, 2008. Some Libyan fighters who helped oust Kadhafi’s regime are now in Syria to join the revolution against Assad.

AFP – Firas, a youth who helped topple Libyan dictator Moamer Kadhafi last year, says Syrians aided in that struggle and he has now come to Syria to return the favour.

“In the Libyan revolution, many Syrians fought on our side, so it is now time to return the favour,” explained Firas, who left his studies in Britain to join the uprising to oust Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

Firas said he had been watching the events in Syria unfold on television and knew he had to do something.

“I am tired of peace conferences, of useless sanctions imposed on the Assad government; I am fed up as people look the other way while Russia and China supply weapons to the regime.

“While the world sits down to talk, women and children here in Syria die under the regime’s artillery fire and nobody does anything about it.”

Firas sees a big difference in the two conflicts.

“In Libya, we had a no-fly zone to which civilians could flee without fear of being systematically bombed, but here the cities have become death traps in which the Assad government punishes the people without a thought,” he said.

Abu Omar, another Libyan fighter, also feels it was his duty to fight in Syria.

“I had to do something for them. At the moment it is important to be here with my brothers,” he said.

The Libyans are fighting Syrian government forces in Aleppo’s Saif al-Dawla district, which has witnessed fierce clashes between the rebels and regime troops for several days now.

“After 30,000 dead you think the Syrians expect Westerners to come and help? Nobody will do anything for them because the life of a Syrian child is not worth that of a Western child,” said Abu Abdo, another Libyan.

“How many more children must die for the West to act,” he asked, adding that he is “fighting against a tyrant who uses weapons bought from the West to massacre his own people.”

He said the Libyans are not fighting a holy war.

“It is not jihad, it is a revolution,” Abu Abdo insisted, adding that “in Syria there are many foreign fighters as we no longer believe in promises coming from the West.”

Firas has his own explanation for why the West is not interfering in the Syrian conflict as it did in Libya.

“In Libya there is oil and gas and the West is still looking for wars from which it can derive economic benefits even if it is at the cost of thousands of lives, as was the case in Iraq,” he said.

“The second reason is that Libya is far from Israel, a war out there does not affect Israel as here a large-scale conflict would be devastating.”

He also pointed to talk about the presence of radical Islamists among the rebels as a concern in the West.

“Does our wearing a beard or praying to a god different than yours make us terrorists or members of Al-Qaeda?” he asked angrily. “If that’s the case, then we are all Al-Qaeda,” he added sarcastically.

“Kadhafi used the same technique. He said we were backed by Al-Qaeda so that Europe would not intervene and he could annihilate us. Here too you are fighting against a dictator who is violating human rights every day and killing his own people.”

Firas warned that the West’s passive approach towards the Syrian conflict is contributing to the rise of pro-Qaeda sentiment among the people and rebels.

“It is undeniable that in Syria, as elsewhere, there are people who support Al-Qaeda,” Firas says.

“I have met a number of fighters from a small group very close (to Al-Qaeda) and it would definitely scare you to talk to them. They are very radical and they hate everything that comes from the West.”

Abu Omar echoes similar fears.

“These people are beginning to smear the Syrian revolution,” he laments.

“But what we must understand is that this is not a religious war; this is a war for a people’s freedom. We have not come from Libya to fight against Shiites or Alawites, but the troops who support the regime, regardless of their faith.”

Journalist Examines Chaotic Fighting In Syria

A Syrian rebel fires toward a position held by regime forces during clashes in the northern city of Aleppo on Sept. 14.

Marco Longari/AFP/GettyImagesA Syrian rebel fires toward a position held by regime forces during clashes in the northern city of Aleppo on Sept. 14.

September 18, 2012

The battle in Syria is being fought by rebel fighters who lack many of the basics typically associated with warfare: helmets, a large supply of ammo, and military planning.

“I was with one fighter who had 11 bullets, and he was, like, roaming as a freelance fighter along the front line trying to pick up a fight somewhere,” journalist Ghaith Abdul-Ahad tells Fresh Air contributor Dave Davies.

Abdul-Ahad describes the situation in Syria as fluid and complicated. A correspondent for the British newspaper The Guardian, Abdul-Ahad reported for the PBS Frontline documentary The Battle for Syria, which airs Tuesday.

“There is chaos, there is no military planning, there is no organization,” he says. “Most of the skirmishes happen like a game of cat and mouse: The tank is the cat. When the tank moves down street, the rebels disperse, run away, try to ambush the tank, they go from a corner to a corner. Meantime, there is shelling [and] mortars raining on them.”

Abdul-Ahad has covered conflicts in Libya, Afghanistan and Iraq for the past nine years — and he says he hasn’t seen such disorder and violence since reporting on Fallujah during the Iraq War in 2004.

“In other conflicts, you meet people and then you hear they died after a few weeks, months, years,” he says. “In Syria, you meet someone in the morning and they die at the end of the day. As one of the officers was saying: ‘The only thing we have plenty of to spend is men.’ ”

The Battle for Syria is an up-close look at insurgents fighting government forces in Aleppo, Syria’s second largest city.

Abdul-Ahad says most of the fighters he has met — some of whom are jihadis, secularists or Salafists — are “just driven by the spirit of the Arab Spring, the spirit of the revolution … fighting to topple [Bashar] Assad because they wanted a form of dignity. They were tired of being ruled like sheep, enslaved by one family, one ruling party.”

Ghaith says he sees the recent protests and violence in Egypt and Libya as manufactured events by Salafists [ultra-conservative Muslims] looking to drive religion into daily political life.

He says if the film that insulted the Prophet Muhammad were the motivation behind the demonstrations, there would have been millions of Muslims in the streets of Cairo and Libya, not just hundreds or thousands.

“There are so many grievances against the West, but [they’re] not necessarily the reason for these demonstrations. We are not entering a new era of anti-American feelings,” he says.

Ghaith Abdul-Ahad is a correspondent for The Guardian reporting for PBS Frontline.

Martin Argles/The Guardian/APGhaith Abdul-Ahad is a correspondent for The Guardian reporting for PBS Frontline.

Interview Highlights

On Syrian rebels posing as Salafists, followers of an ultra-conservative sect of Islam

“They are very, very restrictive in the way they interpret Islam. They have a very specific ideology … You see them as probably 30-40 percent of all the fighting that happens in Syria. …

“Why? Because most of the support is coming again from the Gulf countries, from Saudi, from Qatar, who really espouse these ideologies. And again, they [Syrian rebels] really have to take money from these countries because no one else is giving them money. I’ve met Syrian rebels who grow beards, who espouse this very conservative radical rhetoric when they speak. In reality, they drink, they take drugs, they have nothing to do with Islam, but they have to adopt this ideology to get money and support.”

On the crowds demonstrating sadness over Ambassador Stevens’ death

“[There are] far more people in Libya, in Tunis, in Cairo — especially in Libya — who support what the ambassador was doing in Libya than the people storming the embassy or killing the poor guy.

“But the reality is, those guys, these Salafists, most of these demonstrations were led by the Salafists — and the Salafists were totally outfitted by this Arab Spring. They were posing as the opposition to these oppressive regimes, they were saying for a long time — they and other Islamists — they were saying that Islam is the solution, that Islam provides the path for the revolution. And then, suddenly, you see those masses pouring into these streets calling for democracy. They didn’t call for Islam … the revolution was never about having an Islamic state.”

On the American approach to Syria

“I think [the U.S. is] taking the worst approach at the moment. They are not openly supporting the rebels, while they are, from under the table, coordinating with the rebels, letting their allies send them a trickle of weapons — the weapons are neither enough for the rebels to win nor for them to be defeated.

“So you have this prolonged conflict and mainly because of — not only the West, but the whole international community — paralysis of the Syrian situation. For months, the activists, the people were demonstrating in the streets, but no one wanted to touch the Syrian uprising because they feared it might change the balances in the Middle East. …

“So I think a big opportunity was missed when the activists were not supported, with the paralysis of the international community, allowing Russia, China and Iran to play a huge, big role in this conflict, allowing the Saudis and Qataris to sponsor militias and send weapons. So [the U.S. is] neither supporting the rebels, nor … stopping this conflict.”

Syrian Rebels Seize Control Of A Border Crossing

It’s believed to be the first time they’ve taken the border area in the northern province of Raqqa.

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